Is the Chinese Students and Scholars Association an “Affiliate” of the Communist Party? Would Joining Make Me Ineligible for a Green Card?

A reader asks:

I am a student at the University of … with an F-1 visa. I’m a senior. I will be applying for optional practical training (OPT) work authorization. Hope to find an employer to sponsor me for an H-1B visa and a green card. I heard that a green card application can be denied if the applicant has belonged to an organization “affiliated with” the Communist Party.  If that’s true, could membership in the Chinese Students and Scholars Association be a problem?

Continue reading “Is the Chinese Students and Scholars Association an “Affiliate” of the Communist Party? Would Joining Make Me Ineligible for a Green Card?”

Steve Miller, Meet Saum Song Bo: What the Statue of Liberty Symbolizes

On August 2, White House adviser Stephen Miller held a press conference defending President Donald Trump’s support for the RAISE Act, legislation that would reduce legal immigration to the United States.

CNN reporter Jim Acosta asked whether the bill is in keeping with Emma Lazarus’ sonnet, The New Colossus, at the base of the Statue of Liberty, which reads in part: Continue reading “Steve Miller, Meet Saum Song Bo: What the Statue of Liberty Symbolizes”

Quotes and Quips

Immigration is the sincerest form of flattery.
— Jack Paar, author and comedian, hosted The Tonight Show 1957-1962.
The most fundamental legislative goal of the white nationalist movement is to limit nonwhite immigration. It is important to remember that such limits were in place during the lifetimes of many current white nationalists; it was the default status until the 1960s. In the 1790s, the first naturalization laws of the United States Congress limited citizenship to a “free white person.”
R. Derek Black, son of former Alabama Klan leader. Derek was following in his father’s footsteps until he began to question the white nationalist movement’s ideology.

Continue reading “Quotes and Quips”

Expeditious Naturalization under Section 319(b) for Spouses of U.S. Citizens Employed Abroad

This article covers the requirements and procedures for spouses of U.S. citizens employed abroad by U.S. employers to apply for expeditious naturalization under section 319(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.[1]

The main benefit of expeditious naturalization is that the applicant is exempt from the normal requirements that he or she (a) continuously reside in the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident (LPR) for 3 or 5 years immediately prior to filing the naturalization application[2]; and (b) be physically present in the U.S. for one half of that time.[3] Continue reading “Expeditious Naturalization under Section 319(b) for Spouses of U.S. Citizens Employed Abroad”

The RAISE Act Would Harm U.S. Families and Businesses

The Reforming American Immigration for a Strong Economy Act (RAISE) Act – introduced by Senators Tom Cotton and David Perdue, with the support of President Trump – would eliminate the immigration system that we know today and replace it with a points-based system that ignores the benefits of family unity and the needs of U.S. employers. Continue reading “The RAISE Act Would Harm U.S. Families and Businesses”

Quick Takes on U.S. & China Visa Law News

Daniel Bell, Why Anyone Can Be Chinese (Wall St. Journal, July 14, 2017): Daniel Bell is a Canadian by birth who has who has taught political science in China for twenty years, speaks Chinese, and studies Confucian philosophy. In this essay, he writes, “I identify with Chinese culture” but objects that “no one considers me Chinese” because he is white. He wishes that China would “embrace those” like him “who meet the cultural criteria of Chineseness.” He recommends that China institute a “meritocratic immigration policy open to all.” / Bell’s most recent book, The China Model (2015), analyzes the philosophical and practical flaws of democracy, while arguing for the “China Model” in which a society’s leaders are chosen on the basis of meritocracy–through examinations and performance evaluations. Let’s put aside momentarily the question of to what extent China’s party-state really is meritocratic. Let’s also put aside the question of whether embracing “the cultural criteria of Chineseness” equates to merit. Bell’s yearning to belong is understandable because it is a primal, universal urge. But how can his proposed “meritocratic immigration system” overcome racial conceptions of what it means to be Chinese, especially since Bell says that “the obstacles are not legal”? Continue reading “Quick Takes on U.S. & China Visa Law News”